2:20 am - Sat, Oct 6, 2012
1,505 notes
10:03 pm - Mon, Jul 23, 2012
46 notes
amyipaguana:

Woodblock print by Yoshitsuya of Sanada Yoshitada overcoming Matano Kageisha before a waterfall, made in 1895 © Bradford, Museums, Galleries & Heritage (Cartwright Hall)
http://www.mylearning.org/my-culture-quest/images/2-986/

amyipaguana:

Woodblock print by Yoshitsuya of Sanada Yoshitada overcoming Matano Kageisha before a waterfall, made in 1895 © Bradford, Museums, Galleries & Heritage (Cartwright Hall)

http://www.mylearning.org/my-culture-quest/images/2-986/


(via hanataiyouame)

10:21 am - Wed, Jun 13, 2012
56 notes

yajifun:

ehon tsuzoku sangokushi / Katsushika Taito II

絵本通俗三国志 池田東籬 校正 二代目葛飾戴斗 画 1836~1841年

“趙雲幼主を守護して土坑(おとしあな)を出る”

“太史慈 計(はかりこと)成らずして討死す”

(via alpha-minuz)

12:00 am - Mon, Jun 11, 2012
722 notes
geisha-licious:

maiko Toshikana

geisha-licious:

maiko Toshikana

(via geisha-kai)

1:47 am - Sat, May 26, 2012
74 notes

lotusprince:

No less than Uesugi Kenshin had this masterpiece (the moon and hare are intimately associated in Japanese mythology, explaining why rabbits were acceptable motifs to feudal warlords

(via plegarmour)

12:02 am - Wed, May 23, 2012
439 notes
revolutionismyboyfriend:

Japan series continued. This is Kimbei Kusakabe. I will post more of his pictures, eventually.

revolutionismyboyfriend:

Japan series continued. This is Kimbei Kusakabe. I will post more of his pictures, eventually.

(via alpha-minuz)

10:11 am - Sun, May 13, 2012
8,350 notes

glovesh:

‘VOGUE KOREA’ (2007)

출처(source) / www.vogue.com

(Source: , via alpha-minuz)

2:16 am - Sun, Apr 15, 2012
24 notes
kenbluemoon:

black & white / bw / geisha / geiko / focus / dof / women by momoyama on Flickr.
3:13 am - Mon, Apr 9, 2012
11,041 notes

cmfcknw:

The Catacombs of Paris


Paris has a deeper and stranger connection to its underground than almost any city, and that underground is one of the richest. The arteries and intestines of Paris, the hundreds of miles of tunnels that make up some of the oldest and densest subway and sewer networks in the world, are just the start of it. Under Paris there are spaces of all kinds: canals and reservoirs, crypts and bank vaults, wine cellars transformed into nightclubs and galleries. Most surprising of all are the carrières—the old stone quarries that fan out in a deep and intricate web under many neighborhoods, mostly in the southern part of the metropolis.

These sections of caverns and tunnels have been transformed into underground ossuaries, holding the remains of about 6 million people. Opened in the late 18th century, the underground cemetery became a tourist attraction on a small scale from the early 19th century, and has been open to the public on a regular basis from 1874.

The official name for these subterranean veins is l’Ossuaire Municipal. Although the cemetery portion covers only a small section of underground tunnels comprising “les carrières de Paris”, Parisians today often refer to the entire tunnel network as “The Catacombs.”

1:07 am - Wed, Jun 15, 2011
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